Turkey deep fryers can cause serious personal injuries

Posted By Kinnard, Clayton & Beveridge || Nov 23, 2011

Tomorrow many families in Tennessee and around the country will be enjoying their Thanksgiving meal. And while the day is supposed to be a day of thanks and time to spend with loved ones, for those who decide to deep fry their turkey, the serious personal injury and fire risks could lead to tragedy in just a matter of minutes.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, using an indoor or outdoor turkey fryer that uses oil is dangerous. For one thing, the temperatures to deep fry reach a minimum of 350 degrees Fahrenheit, which means any kind of contact with the skin can result in a very serious burn.

Additionally, the turkey fryers that use oil to cook the bird are also by nature more dangerous because of the risks of the fryer being jarred or tipped, or hot oil splashing out during the cooking process. And while this hot oil can result in burns to the body, the oil can also hit nonmetallic materials and cause a house fire.

And, even in situations where the cooker is completely aware of all of the risks involved, and works hard to try and avoid any oil from spilling, things like rain and the turkey not being completely defrosted before being placed in the fryer can lead to splattering of hot oil.

Lastly, there is also always the concern about the turkey fryer itself being defective. For example, what if the temperature control designed to prevent the fryer from overheating does not work properly? Or what if the stand holding the unit suddenly collapses? Both of these scenarios could lead to serious injuries for the cook, and anyone who else who is over the house for dinner.

Due to the risk for injury or property destruction, the NFPA encourages people this year to either purchase a fried turkey through grocery stores, restaurants or even specialty stores. And, according to the fire prevention agency, if you still insist on frying your own turkey, it's best to use a fryer that does not require any oil.

Categories: Personal Injury
Blog Home